A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W

 

Safety line

Webbing strap about 1.5 m long with snap hooks. Fastened to the personal safety harness and the boat.

Sail loft

A place where sails are made and repaired.

Sea State

A part of the Beaufort scale which describes the height and danger of the wave formation caused by wind.

Separation

The distance between the boats measured 90 degrees on a line running from start to finish.

Screaming fifties

Between 50 and 60 degrees south.

Shackle

Metal fitting for attaching ropes to blocks, blocks to pad eyes etc.

Sheet

Rope that controls a sail.

Shroud

Wires, rods or a special construction attached to the side of the mast and usually lead over spreaders, helping to hold up the mast and to control its bend.

Skipper

The person in charge onboard.

Skin fitting

A fitting fastened each side of the hull skin. Can be opened in order to pass fluids in or out.

Snap shackle

Quick release shackle used to attach things like spinnaker sheets to spinnakers. Usually released by poking a spike through an aperture in the shackle which releases a trigger which is why bowmen have spikes slung on their climbing harnesses.

Soundings

Numbers on a chart showing depth.

Southern Ocean

Ocean between Antarctica and around 40 degrees south.

Spar

A part of the rig used to support a sail, for instance, mast, boom, spinnaker pole, bowsprit.

Spinnaker

Big, lightweight sail for faster sailing off the wind. Divided into asymmetric and symmetrical spinnakers, Volvo Open 70s generally use only asymmetric spinnakers.

Spreader

A strut from the side of the mast used to give a wider angle to stays and therefore reduce compression on the mast.

Spring tide

Tides with the biggest range and strongest currents.

Starboard

Right hand side of the boat (facing forwards).

Stay

Part of the rigging (standing rigging) used to hold up the mast. A generic term for the individual parts of standing rigging like forestays, backstays, cap shrouds, intermediates and diagonals.

Staysail

A small headsail set back from the bow and between the jib and mainsail to effectively narrow the slot between the jib and the mainsail. Also used when sailing at certain wind angles with an asymmetrical spinnaker.

Standby watch

Someone who is dressed to go on deck even if he is off watch.

Standing rigging

Shrouds and stays which keep the mast in place.

Stanchions

Posts which hold life lines along the rail.

Starboard tack

The sails' position when sailing with the wind from starboard.

StealthPlay

A new tactical initiative for the 2008-09 race, gives the crews one opportunity on each of the longer legs to have their location hidden from position reports and the public for 24 hours (increased from 12 hours from Leg 5 onwards).

In order to deploy a StealthPlay, a team must call Race Headquarters within 30 minutes of the position report being released. The play will last for the next 12 hours and the boat's position will not be shown on the three scheduled reports normally released within that period. The boat will become visible again at the next position report after that period.

Race HQ will continue to monitor each boat's progress every 15 minutes for safety reasons, but this information is not made public until the StealthPlay is over.

Position reporting times will be every three hours at 1000, 1300, 1600, 1900, 2200.

Stern

Back of the boat.

Rudder stock

The vertical shaft that comes from the rudders into the boat, supported by bearings; transfers the steering effort from the wheels, via the quadrant, to the rudder blades in the water. Stocks on Volvo Open 70s are usually made from carbon fibre.

Storm jib

A headsail fastened on the forestay used in winds over 60 knots.

Strobe

A small emergency light which gives of sharp blinks. Everyone carries one at night.

Squall

A cloud formation containing wind and rain.